Friday, February 24, 2017

Peaches-- Part 1


Her name is not known in our history. We only know her as Peaches because she sold peaches at a roadside stand. It was ere the great duke found her. According to legend she was extraordinary, at least not in beauty. She was fair and plump. Her eyes a bit too wide set and her mouth a bit too small. There were at least three other girls in town with better teeth and brighter eyes. But these girls were not left alone on the roadside selling peaches as the duke cantered past each day. And so he desired her, probably not for her great beauty but because she was there and demure and shy as a common girl, a common girl who sold peaches, and had his thrusting and grunting way with ther. When he had finished and jumped back on his stallion, he flipped a few coins on the ground for the pleasure, raised his hat to her, and trotted off.

So there is no surprise that one bright day he got off of his stallion, pulled her behind her cart of peaches, and had his thrusting and grunting way with her.  When he had finished and jumped back on his stallion, he flipped a few coins on the ground for the pleasure, raised his hat to her, and trotted off.

She was undone.  She felt sore and damp and there was such a hurting in her chest from tears that were now stuck there and fear that had dried inside of her instead of on her cheeks.  She looked at the coins and they worried her.  When she came back home with her unsold peaches and her father took accounting of the money and the peaches sold he would ask her, where did these coins come from, and she would have no answer because the truth would make her father angry with her.

And so, she counted out the money and counted out the peaches it would buy.  She carried those peaches in her apron, held like a cradle with five fuzzy little heads.  She dug a hole for each little peach all in a row by the road and into each hole she dropped a fruit.

That night her father counted the money and the peaches and all matched and was well and she sighed in relief that no one noticed the lump of tears that was now on her chest or the salty fear that was on her skin.

The next day she went to the roadside to sell her wares and the duke had his stallion saddled to go for a ride.  As he passed her on the road he tipped his hat to her for the pleasure and rode on.  But there was something odd.  Five little saplings, tall and thin, were by the side of the road, all in a row.  They weren’t there yesterday, but they were there today, and everyone knows that saplings don’t just appear, they grow.  But perhaps he just hadn’t noticed them before.

She dropped a curtsy as he rode past and dropped her eyes to the ground, unable to look at him.  She kept her eyes closed until she couldn’t hear the sound of his horse’s hooves anymore and then she opened her eyes and saw five little saplings standing where yesterday she had buried the peaches.  She saw them and understood, and so she got a bucket and went to the river and she watered and tended the trees, pulling grass and giving them room to grow.

The sun set and the sun rose and once again she went to the roadside with her fruits and once again the duke cantered past, but he did not tip his hat to the girl.  He didn’t even see her or her cart because the five little saplings were now five bright young trees with leaves so green they made his eyes hurt, and hard green fruits that hung, not ready to be picked yet, but promising later days that would be full of delicious flesh to bite and juice to suck.  But for the duke the promise of later fruit was not an attraction.  He was afraid of the young trees and their hard fruit and his horse slowed as he passed the trees, keeping quiet as if they were riding through a graveyard, trying not to wake the ghosts.  She saw his fright and understood and again she tended the trees and gave them water.

The next day it all happened again, the peaches, the roadside stand, the stallion and the saddle.  But this time he did not ride past her nor did he tip his hat.  Instead he stopped and stared at five full grown peach trees with ripened fruit hanging off of each branch, each peach large and a perfect shade of sunset gold.  And though the leaves were green, the same as any other tree, and the bark was brown, the same as any other tree, and the fruit was tempting, same as any other tree, the duke was afraid of the trees and could not ride past them.  He could not bring himself to spur his stallion forward, but turned him and galloped off, back to his castle, where he jumped out of the saddle before the horse had stopped and called for his man.

Cut the trees down! he ordered.  His man bowed and said he would gather some men to go out in the morning.  But the morning wasn’t soon enough for the duke.  The trees must be chopped down now.  The duke’s man bowed again and set off to collect men and axes.

When the men reached the trees the sun was setting behind them and cast the men in a deep green light.  It was beautiful and the men wondered why the duke would want these trees cut down.  It seemed a shame to do it, seeing them filled with fruit and greenery.  But one did not defy the duke and so they lifted their axes and brought them down into those trees.  But it seemed a shame to let such perfect fruit go to waste.  And so the men left their axes to pick the ripe peaches, but not one of them took a bite.  Instead they took off their shirts and laid the peaches carefully bundled in the cloth, far from where the trees would come down, as if trying to keep each small load of peaches as safe and warm as a child. Only when each peach from the trees was safe and sound did they pick up their axes and begin to heave.  

As each tree shuddered under the blows the men cried tears they could not understand, some ashamed and hiding the grief and others openly weeping as one by one, each tree came down.  The men stood by and wept and wailed as if each had killed his own children.

Then, something extraordinary happened.  Out of each stump sprang a fat little child with cheeks as pink as peaches and tummies fat and round.  They giggled and clapped and raced around the weeping men singing:

Oh our father is the duke,
as anyone can see
Our mother she sells peaches
that grow off of a tree.
Our father met our mother
and though he did not know her name,
He led her behind the peaches cart
and plucked her all the same.
Now we are bright new peaches
But our father, for his shame,
Tried to chop us into firewood,
And take away our claim.
But we are smart young peaches
We hid among the roots
And now the duke our father
Must taste of his own fruits.

Then the children ran off before anyone could catch them, though in truth, not one of them tried they were so astounded.

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